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Hooks

I took a basic treble hook since I do not know how to silver solder all that well. This 5/0 shown is much better to show detail than all the other sizes that I have. I did all these steps with a 6, 4, 2, 2/0, 4/0 and 5/0 for a wide range of sizes to use.

What I did is take a 5/0 treble and bend out the back one straighter as to cut it closer to the hook shaft. Then bend the little part back up into the hook. Figured a treble cut would add more strength to the hook itself than using a double tuna hook. This first picture is where I bent the hook into about a 90-degree level. Much more than an about a 75 degree will put too much stress on the shaft and often break it if more is done. So that is why I stuck with a 90-degree angle for this series.

 
Next, I took the barb end of the hooks and bent them out another 5 degrees roughly. I figured that you would just have to give the tip of the rod a quick snap to launch the end of the hook into the cat’s mouth using an angle like this. That should work for the little nibblers that like to pick it up and play around with it tasting the bait before they take it. Channel cats are like that. Well, at least it made sense on paper and sometimes works.

 

So, I enhanced the eyelet end in 5 degrees to give a better angle of attack. This was designed to throw the bar ends out more and into the fish’s mouth with a quick snap. Plus when you use little quick snaps, I it will move the bait up a few inches to give it a live effect and hopefully entice the fish to hit it harder. If they don’t hit it right away drop your rod tip down and let it go back to them. Or, you’re out of bait and time to try it again. General rule of thumb here. Bait up every 15 to 20 minutes.

Then I got to thinking… You do a lot of that out in the boat at times. Let’s do one for doe balls and shad gut since they always slide off the hook easily. So I took a spring and threaded it up the shaft of the hook and secured it to the eyelet. It worked and also the spring aided in some snags getting it off.

Another Hook Tip...I always resharpen any hook that comes out of the box. I found a really easy trick to doing so. Go out and buy 2 chainsaw round files and duct tape them together at both ends. Simply run your hook down the crevice two or three times and you are ready to go.

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Note:  This data was also shared and posted on the BOC site
Saturday, December 14th, 2002

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